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Other embassies and consulates in Berlin

Gabonese flag Embassy of Gabon in Berlin

AddressHohensteiner Str. 16
D-14197 Berlin
Germany
Phonelocal: (030) 8973.3440
international: +49.30.8973.3440
Faxlocal: (030) 8973.3444
international: +49.30.8973.3444

Comments on this Embassy

NELSON KOUASSI
Tue, 14 Nov 2017 02:28 EST
CANDIDATURE SPONTANEE
Bonjour Mr/Mme

Je suis d'origine Africaine, de la côte d'ivoire précisément.
Titulaire d'un MASTER II (BAC +5) en finance. Je bénéficie d'une expérience professionnelle acquise à travers plusieurs stages pratiques.
Je suis en quête d'emploi quelque soit le pays, et quelque soit le domaine d'activité.
une fois réception de votre réponse vous aurez de plus amples informations sur mon , mon CV et autre.
je compte sur votre bienveillance et esprit altruiste, après je salut avec la manière la plus polie.
Merci d'avance
Cordialement NELSON KOUASSI

Émail: kouassi_lya_nelson@yahoo.com
tél: 00225 8751 9001
Line Ringgaard
Sun, 10 Aug 2014 11:42 EDT
MEMORANDUM OF DEMAND
To:Embassy of Gabon in Berlin

World Elephant Day, August 12th


















MEMORANDUM OF DEMAND






It is estimated that an elephant is killed for its ivory every 15 minutes. We are losing a rhino for its horn every nine hours in Africa. There are fewer than 400,000 elephants and less than 18,000 rhinos left in the wild in Africa. Asian elephant numbers have plummeted to 25,000 individuals and fewer than 40 Javan rhinos, 300 Sumatran rhinos and 2,400 Indian rhinos remain in the wild.






All of these species, and many more critically endangered and threatened animals like lion, tiger and pangolin, are targeted by international wildlife criminals for their highly lucrative body parts; if the slaughter is permitted to continue at present rates, these species will be extinct within the next decade or less.





Increasingly, wildlife trafficking is threatening global ecosystems and the geopolitical stability of the African continent; smuggling operations by international criminal cartels and the scale of poaching has become an incomprehensible horror. Profits accrued by the illicit sale of ivory and rhino horn are n the billions; poaching is literally sponsoring terrorism and threatening national and international security.






This must stop. And with your government’s help and political will it can be stopped.






We ask that your government recognize the strength of our global movement and the right of people everywhere in the world to have a say in what happens to our collective natural heritage.






Specifically, we call on your government to:






1. Apply political will and leadership to put an end to wildlife trafficking






2. Implement a complete ban on commercial international and domestic trade of all endangered wildlife body parts, including but not limited to ivory, rhino horn, pangolin, lion and tiger bone






3. Shut down all retail outlets for ivory and rhino horn products and terminate all industries associated with these






4. Adopt more stringent legislation to combat and deter criminal activities relating to wildlife crime as a matter of urgency










5. Tackle corruption and money-laundering linked to illegal wildlife trafficking by investigating and halting corruption among government officials, police and park officials who protect the kingpins; arrest and prosecute the ivory and rhino horn kingpins to the fullest extent of the law without exception; and adopt or amend legislation to criminalize corruption that facilitates poaching and wildlife trafficking






6. Adopt more punitive sentencing laws for wildlife traffickers and strengthen enforcement of laws associated with wildlife crime






7. Lobby the United Nations, including the Security Council and General Assembly, to adopt sanctions against those countries in violation of intergovernmental agreements as adopted by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)






8. Engage other governments in relevant bilateral, regional and international mechanisms






9. Publicly destroy all confiscated wildlife products and renounce the use of products from endangered and threatened species






10. Adopt or amend legislation to criminalize poaching and wildlife trafficking and ensure such criminal offences are identified as serious crimes within the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC), as called for in Resolution 2013/40 of the UN Economic Council






11. Engage in international co-operation programs, including extradition and mutual legal assistance where criminal offences are transnational in nature





12. Strengthen legal frameworks and facilitate strict law enforcement to assist in prosecution of wildlife traffickers and imposition of penalties that will act as proper deterrents to wildlife crime




13. Strengthen law enforcement, cross-border and regional co-operation to protect populations of threatened or endangered species from poachers and illegal wildlife trafficking




14. Apply pressure on the government of China to bring the trade in ivory and horn to an end; specifically, to close its ivory carving factories and stop issuing licenses for these establishments; to destroy its stockpiles of ivory and confiscate all ivory imports; and to impose the strictest penalties on Chinese citizens found in possession of or involved in the illegal trade of ivory and rhino horn





On 4 October 2014 - World Animal Day - people in more than 113 cities across the world are marching in protest against the illegal wildlife trade and to call on their governments to take action to end poaching and the trade in ivory and rhino horn.






We ask you to show leadership, wisdom and foresight in acknowledging our cause and helping to stop illegal wildlife trade once and for all.







Global March for Elephants and Rhinos - Copenhagen






On the Web: http://www.March4ElephantsAndRhinos.org/


On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/March4Elephants


On Twitter: Twitter.com/EleRhinoMarch


Email: March4ElesAndRhinos@gmail.com

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